School Logo
  Home       Parents       News       Pupils' Work       Enrichment Programme
   

You are here Our Science & Maths Work Energy & Heat Materials Properties of Materials.

Question: Which material will keep Miss Meyler's tea warm the longest?

1. Talk and discussion: We discussed selected materials > tea towel, tin foil, bubble wrap and newspaper.
2. We made our first prediction.
3. Tea time.
4. We felt each tea cup and made a second prediction.
5. We used a thermometer to measure the exact temperature in each mug.
6. We waited 10 minutes and measured each temperature again.
7. We all made a final prediction before hearing the results from our measurement leaders.
8. The measurements were announced by Faye. Some of us were very surprised!

Isobel Furlong: Prediction: (1) Bubble Wrap and (2) Tinfoil. Conclusion: The 'newspaper' was the best insulator (35 degrees C). The 'cloth' was the poorest insulator (32 degrees C). 'Nothing' was the coldest (31 degfrees C)

Megan Redmond: Prediction: (1) Tinfoil, (2) Tea Towel and (3) paper. Conclusion: The 'newspaper' was the best insulator (35 degrees C). The 'cloth' was the poorest insulator (32 degrees C).

Charlie Rooney: Prediction: (1) Tinfoil, (2) Tea Towel and (3) Newspaper. Conclusion: The 'newspaper' was the best insulator (35 degrees C). The 'cloth' was the poorest insulator (32 degrees C). 'Nothing' was the coldest (31 degfrees C)

Bartek Krzak: Prediction: (1) Nothing, (2) Tinfoil and (3) Newspaper Conclusion: The 'newspaper' was the best insulator (32 degrees C) and 'nothing' was the coldest (31 degrees C).

Lilly Jones: Prediction: (1) Bubble wrap, (2) Bubble wrap and (3) Bubble wrap! Conclusion: The 'newspaper' was the best insulator (35 degrees C). The 'cloth' was the poorest insulator (32 degrees C). 'Nothing' was the coldest (31 degfrees C).